Archive for the ‘Disease resistant’ Category

Blue Star Amsonia Is A Solid Performer

Blue Star (Amsonia tabernaemontana) is native to the central U.S. (USDA hardiness zones 3-9). This herbaceous perennial is frequently seen growing in open woodlands in the midwest and south to Florida and Texas. In mid-spring (in Tennessee), plants are filled with clusters of soft light blue star-like flowers, each nearly ¾ inches across. This clump-forming perennial […]

Stop The “Crape Murder”

In Tennessee (where I live) and in the Southeastern U.S., bad crape myrtle (Lagerstroemia x) pruning continues to be done by professional landscapers and homeowners (USDA hardiness zones 6-9). This practice, also called “topping”, reduces tree (or shrub) height. Over 25 years, Southern Living magazine called this “crape murder”. Crape murder is not going away. More crape […]

Shopping Tips When Purchasing Plants

    Spring and fall are excellent planting times and buying opportunities. A trips to a garden center can be very costly unless you go prepared. Here are some practical tips to make those shopping trips more enjoyable and a lot less expensive. Create your landscape plan first before buying plants. First, visit garden centers to pick up great landscaping ideas […]

Little Goblin® Series Of Deciduous Hollies

Little Goblin® Red (Ilex verticillata ‘NCIV1’) is one of the new creation from plant breeder Dr. Tom Ranney, at the North Carolina Research And Extension Center in Mills River, NC. It is the first ever tetraploid winterberry. This dwarf variety is also exceptionally hardy and easy to care for. Little Goblin® Orange (‘NCIV2’) is extremely early flowering and […]

Saving Heirloom Seeds

At the end of each growing season, you may choose to collect seeds from favorite flowering annuals and vegetables to holdover and plant in next year’s garden. Some may be heirloom varieties that you have saved for many years because you like their productivity or flavor. Note: these seeds should not be “hybrids”. Hybrids represent a cross between […]

Small Southern Magnolia Cultivars

Southern Magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora) is one of nature’s magnificent landscape trees (USDA hardiness zones 6-9).  This reliable large tree, native to the Southern U.S., is at home in well-drained clay soils and hot summers. The species typically grows to 60-80 feet tall with a pyramidal (young) to a rounded crown (mature tree). It is not uncommon […]

Announcing AAS Ornamental Winners For 2017

All American Selection (AAS) has named six Ornamental winners for 2017. Some include some new color breakthough in the series that you already know as well as some newbies. Dianthus ‘Supra Pink’ (Hem Genetics) is an easy-to-grow interspecific dianthus for three-seasons (spring, summer, fall) of garden color. Its mottled, frilly pink flowers stand up to summer’s heat and […]

Announcing The AAS 2017 Vegetable Winners

For 2017 All-America Selections (AAS) has selected these winners in the vegetable category. Each is an outstanding garden performer compared to other varieties that it tested against. Three are national winners and one is a regional winner. Fennel ‘Antares’ (Bejo Seed) is a national winner. AAS had never before trialed fennel previously. This beautiful plant has multiple uses: as […]

Polar Express Sunbelt Rose Big Winner At 2016 Biltmore Gardens Rose Trial

If you grow roses in the U.S. Mid-South region, the historic Biltmore Gardens in Asheville, NC is key source for discovering what varieties you should be growing. Recently, a jury of world rose experts selected the winning roses in the 2016 Biltmore International Rose Trials. Since 2011, Biltmore’s historic Rose Garden has been home to the trials in which more […]

Grow Something Different With Redvein Maple

In the world of maples the snakebark trait is unique. Redvein maple (Acer rufinerve) from Japan belongs in this maple category (USDA hardiness zones 5-7). It is a small to medium deciduous tree or large shrub with an upright branching framework. A young tree starts off slowly and may grow only to 12-15 feet in 10 to 12 years. The species […]