Archive for the ‘Spruces (Picea spp.)’ Category

Live Cut Foliage And Berries For Home Holiday Decorations

Many conifers make great cuts for indoor and outdoor Christmas decorations. Foliage choices: Eastern red cedar and many other junipers, white pine, Norway spruce, Colorado spruce, Balsam fir, Canadian hemlock, Arizona cypress (and cultivars ‘Carolina Sapphire’ and ‘Blue Ice’),  and False cypresses (C. pisifera). Needle retention varies among species. For example, Norway spruce and balsam […]

ACS SOUTHEAST REGION CONIFER REFERENCE GARDENS*

I hear people say that conifers won’t grow in the southeastern U.S. Wanta bet! 2016 marks the 8th year of the Reference Garden program sponsored by the American Confer Society (ACS)- Southeast Region. From Kentucky and Virginia south to Florida, 19 public gardens were now participating in the program. Two of the latest additions are Brookgreen […]

Landscaping Plantings Around A Garden Railroad

      Garden railroad layouts are becoming more popular. A number of dwarf and compact growing plants play a major role in landscaping around the layout. Many miniature forms of taller varieties are available. Here are several great plant choices to add the your garden railroad: Trees and Shrubs – offer scale or tall canopy […]

Purchasing A Cut Christmas Tree

Around the holidays lots of people head out to local Christmas farms to purchase a tree. Local farms offer the best freshly cut trees that should last 3 or more weeks inside your home. Trees for sale in urban lots may have been harvested  between 1-4 weeks earlier and shipped to your vicinity. A cut Christmas […]

Conifers for Small Garden Spaces

Some properties can not accommodate the enormous size of tall evergreen trees. In the world of conifers, a select number of genetically dwarf species and varieties are better fits for small spaces. Most evergreens are sun lovers and require a well-drained soil. Mulching around trees and shrubs also benefits to conserve soil moisture and keep roots cool. […]

Monitor And Manage Two-Spotted Spider Mites

              Two-spotted spider mites are destructive pests that ravage a wide host of shrubs and garden plants, including certain house plants, annuals, perennials, herbs and vegetables. Many evergreens are also susceptible. Two-spotted spider mites are warm season arachnids, not insects, and are exceptionally troublesome over a hot dry summer. They […]

Widely Planted Norway Spruce

Norway spruce (Picea abies) is a large pyramidal evergreen conifer. It is native to the mountains of northern and central Europe where it often matures to 100 feet or more in height. In the cool temperate areas of the U.S. and Canada, Norway spruce is widely planted, typically reaching 50 to 80 feet tall at maturity (USDA hardiness […]

Buying/Planting A Live Christmas Tree

A living Christmas tree—one that’s planted outdoors after the holidays—has become a tradition with many families to commemorate a birth or someone’s passing. Purchase a live Christmas tree and plant it in your landscape after the holidays. Pre-dig a planting hole ahead because outdoor weather may not be suitable for digging. For safety sake, fill it with leaves or mulch to prevent freezing or […]

List Of Conifer Reference Gardens In Southeastern U.S.

              American Conifer Society Reference Gardens in the Southeastern Region                                                             March 2015                           Want to learn about which evergreen and deciduous conifers grow well in your area. The American Conifer Society (ACS) has established a reference garden network across the U.S. If you are developing dwarf conifer collection […]

Conifers For Poorly Drained Soils

Before planting conifers in your landscape, it’s absolutely important to know the drainage (percolation rate) of the soil, particularly if it is clay-based. Most conifers prefer well-drained sandy and clay loam soils. To determine your soil type and rate of drainage, try the “hole test” recommended by Virginia Tech University horticulturists. Dig a hole approximately one foot deep […]