Archive for the ‘pin oak’ Category

Eliminating Messy Fruits From Large Landscape Trees

Messy fruit from yard trees are dreaded by property owners as well as park and city employees. Some notorious culprits are sweetgums, sycamores (planetrees), oaks, mulberries, persimmons, and (female) ginkgoes. Fruits include hundreds of hard nuts or pulpy, smelly, and potentially hazardous covering sidewalks, driveways, and parking lots. Foliar sprays are available to reduce or eliminate […]

How Drought Affects Our Landscape Trees*

Long term drought can be devastating on landscape and woodland trees. An environmentally stressed tree must expend additional energy to survive. Extremes of drought leads to decreases in trunk diameter and height growth, declining resistance to pests and diseases, less food production via photosynthesis, and in flower and fruit production. Symptoms of drought stress include wilted […]

Five Simple Pruning Tips For DIYers

Gardeners are frequently scared about making pruning mistakes. There are lots of gardening books filled with lots of before and after photos. Let’s face facts…your yard tree or shrub does look like the ones pictured in the pruning book. Here are my simple 5 steps for pruning: Why and When to prune: You can prune a […]

Leaf Retention In Landscape Trees

              Most deciduous landscape trees drop their leaves sometime in autumn. The physiology of autumn leaf drop is primarily stimulated by changes in photoperiod or shorter daylength. Autumn colors develop and the leaf petioles form an abscission layer. Black gum (Nyssa sylvatica), for example, start to color up in early September. Winter leaf retention by […]

Black Gum Should Be Planted More

  U.S. native black gum (Nyssa sylvatica), aka sour gum or black tupelo, is a medium to large shade tree. A young tree has an attractive pyramidal habit and dependable fall color. In the past transplanting black gum has been an issue, but modern advances in growing and planting practices have been solved. New cultivars […]

"pH Nutrient Creep? -You Nailed It"

Photo: Foliar iron deficiency on river birchRiver birch (Betula nigra) is a popular landscape tree in the Southern Appalachian region (USDA zones 6-7). The cultivars ‘Heritage’ and ‘Duraheat’ have made a good native species even better with resistance to aphid and leafhopper insects. However, river birch demands a soil pH which is moderately acid. Why? […]