Archive for the ‘Ginkgo biloba’ Category

Eliminating Messy Fruits From Large Landscape Trees

Messy fruit from yard trees are dreaded by property owners as well as park and city employees. Some notorious culprits are sweetgums, sycamores (planetrees), oaks, mulberries, persimmons, and (female) ginkgoes. Fruits include hundreds of hard nuts or pulpy, smelly, and potentially hazardous covering sidewalks, driveways, and parking lots. Foliar sprays are available to reduce or eliminate […]

Landscaping Plantings Around A Garden Railroad

      Garden railroad layouts are becoming more popular. A number of dwarf and compact growing plants play a major role in landscaping around the layout. Many miniature forms of taller varieties are available. Here are several great plant choices to add the your garden railroad: Trees and Shrubs – offer scale or tall canopy […]

Landscape Trees With Winter Interest

Does your winter landscape look a bit shabby? This coming spring take some action by planting trees that should perk up its appearance. New tree choices should ratchet up seasonal interest, attract more bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds in the spring-summer and hungry fruit feeding birds in fall-winter. Making smart tree choices can add four-seasons of interest to your yard. […]

List Of Dioecious Trees And Shrubs

              Some tree species are dioecious, that is produce single sex flowers (either male and female). Male flowers produce pollen and no fruits. Female flowers bear seeds or fruits.  You may purchase male clones to avoid picking up messy seed pods or capsules in the fall. If you are allergic to certain tree pollens, avoid […]

Landscape Trees With Messy Fruits

              Fruit avoidance is on the mind of many property owners when purchasing trees and shrubs for their yard. Many like crabapples, mulberries and Chinese (kousa) dogwoods produce fleshy or pulpy fruits that mess lawns, walkways and stain parked cars. Many, not all, are non-native and foraging birds and […]

Dwarf Ginkgoes For Small Spaces

  Prehistoric Ginkgo trees (Ginkgo biloba) are easily identified by their triangular shaped leaves (USDA hardiness zones 4-8). Trees mature to huge sizes, up to 80 – 90 feet high. Their growth rates are initially slow during the early establishment years. Ginkgo tree are “dioecious”, either male and female. Most (not all) ginkgoes develop into tall pyramidal […]

List Of Conifer Reference Gardens In Southeastern U.S.

              American Conifer Society Reference Gardens in the Southeastern Region                                                             March 2015                           Want to learn about which evergreen and deciduous conifers grow well in your area. The American Conifer Society (ACS) has established a reference garden network across the U.S. If you are developing dwarf conifer collection […]

Ginkgo -Sex Education 101

Surviving an autumn season with a heavily fruited ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba) tree is a foul smelling experience. The odorous yellow fleshy fruits ripen in October and drop onto public streets and home lawns. Several times I have witnessed the Jonesborough Tennessee Fire Department raking up fallen fruit and hosing down a sidewalk too treacherous to walk […]