Archive for the ‘Dogwood (Cornus)’ Category

How Drought Affects Our Landscape Trees*

Long term drought can be devastating on landscape and woodland trees. An environmentally stressed tree must expend additional energy to survive. Extremes of drought leads to decreases in trunk diameter and height growth, declining resistance to pests and diseases, less food production via photosynthesis, and in flower and fruit production. Symptoms of drought stress include wilted […]

Powdery Mildew Disease Resistant Cultivars

Gardeners have learned to associate certain plants with a troublesome disease(s). Powdery and downy mildews have become epidemic in many regions of the U.S. Best ways for managing mildew diseases are prevention, good cultural practices, and spraying.. First, avoid planting susceptible cultivars. Plant in the proper location and space plants far enough apart so they’re not touching. Surrounding […]

Five Simple Pruning Tips For DIYers

Gardeners are frequently scared about making pruning mistakes. There are lots of gardening books filled with lots of before and after photos. Let’s face facts…your yard tree or shrub does look like the ones pictured in the pruning book. Here are my simple 5 steps for pruning: Why and When to prune: You can prune a […]

Landscape Trees With Winter Interest

Does your winter landscape look a bit shabby? This coming spring take some action by planting trees that should perk up its appearance. New tree choices should ratchet up seasonal interest, attract more bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds in the spring-summer and hungry fruit feeding birds in fall-winter. Making smart tree choices can add four-seasons of interest to your yard. […]

Saving Heirloom Seeds

At the end of each growing season, you may choose to collect seeds from favorite flowering annuals and vegetables to holdover and plant in next year’s garden. Some may be heirloom varieties that you have saved for many years because you like their productivity or flavor. Note: these seeds should not be “hybrids”. Hybrids represent a cross between […]

Chinese (Kousa) Dogwood

              Chinese dogwood, aka kousa dogwood, (Cornus kousa) is a small 25 to 35 foot flowering tree (USDA hardiness zones 5-9). It grows in either full or partial sunlight (4-hours sunlight minimum). Depending where you garden, kousa dogwood begins blooming from late April or in May, almost two weeks after our native […]

Should You Plant In Fall?

            Should you plant in the Fall? It depends what region you live in, what month in fall, and what species you’re planting. If you live in the mid-Atlantic, coastal New England, or Southeastern U.S., fall is an excellent time to set most hardy plants. Most (not all) trees, shrubs, perennials, […]

‘Cherokee Brave’– Outstanding “Red” Flowering Dogwood

Flowering dogwood (Cornus florida) is the most beautiful of U.S. native flowering trees (USDA hardiness zones 5 to 9). It typically grows 15-30 feet tall, but larger forms are known. The tree is broadly-pyramidal at a young age, branching is low, and matures with a rounded canopy. Spring bloom time usually overlaps with redbud (Cercis […]

Pest Alert: Japanese Maple Scale Becoming A Serious Problem

  Japanese maple scale is a new pest in Tennessee and surrounding states. It infests many more plant species than just Japanese maple. The insect’s small size and ability to blend in naturally with tree bark makes it challenging to detect until populations are high and it has infested large landscape and neighborhoods. Japanese maple scale […]

Preventing Powdery Mildew Disease On Summer Plants

Powdery mildews are serious fungal leaf diseases infecting many garden plants. Each one is host specific. The powdery mildew that attacks summer phlox does not infect zinnias or pumpkin vines. Powdery mildew disease on crape myrtles does not attack lilacs or roses. In recent years new powdery mildew diseases have popped up on dogwoods and […]