Archive for the ‘compact shrub’ Category

Landscaping Plantings Around A Garden Railroad

      Garden railroad layouts are becoming more popular. A number of dwarf and compact growing plants play a major role in landscaping around the layout. Many miniature forms of taller varieties are available. Here are several great plant choices to add the your garden railroad: Trees and Shrubs – offer scale or tall canopy […]

Arctic Fire™ Dogwood Brightens Up Winter Landscape

Red-twig or red osier dogwood (Cornus stolonifera) is a native shrub (USDA hardiness zones 2-7). It reaches 8 to 10 feet in height and roots sucker prolifically. It can become a chore keeping it contained in small garden spaces. Arctic Fire™ is a superior cultivar identified by its fiery red stems and compact growth habit. Expect […]

Crape Myrtles Exhibit Beautiful Bark In Winter

The flowers of crape myrtles are a wonderful floral treat in the summer months, several exhibit gorgeous exfoliating bark. Some also show off autumn foliage colors. Here are the best ten species and cultivars of crape myrtles noted for their exfoliating bark. Lagerstroemia hybrids (L. indica x L. fauriei) Hopi – 8-10 feet semi-dwarf shrub; gray brown exfoliating bark; medium pink […]

Japanese Larch Is Preferred In Northern U.S.

Larches (Larix spp.) are majestic deciduous conifers in their northern ranges of their habitat (USDA hardiness zone 4 to 7). However, trees do not prosper in hot and humid summers south of USDA Zone 7. One of the best is Japanese larch (Larix kaempferi), but unfortunately, it is not commonly planted in U.S. landscapes. The tree averages 50-60 feet in height and 25-35 […]

‘Midwinter Fire’ Dogwood Brightens Up The Winter Landscape

Bloodtwig dogwood (Cornus sanguinea), indigenous to Europe and Asia, is an upright branched, round-topped, spreading deciduous shrub (USDA hardiness zones 5 to 7). In the wild the species matures to 8-15 feet in height and spread. Its common name “bloodtwig” is misleading. Winter wood on 1-2 year old branches is not red. Instead, winter stems turn […]

Mapleleaf Viburnum For Woodland Areas

The genus Viburnum is a rich source of over 150 species of great flowering shrubs worldwide. Many viburnums are native to North America including mapleleaf viburnum (Viburnum acerifolium). This totally underutilized deciduous viburnum is a great choice to plant in shrub borders, foundation, or hedging, as well as to naturalize in an open woodland area (zone 3-8). Shrub grows 4 – […]

Some Zone 7 Camellias Survive In Zone 6 As Well

  A short list of early blooming Sasanqua camellias possess the  ability to do grow well in zone 6 areas. In my opinion, the zone 7 cultivar ‘Shishigashira’ steps to the head of the class. It is a November bloomer that has proven to be exceptionally cold hardy dwarf variety. The good folks at Cam Too, a camellia […]

“Plant It Pink” Planting Program

  To build awareness and show support for those affected by breast cancer, over 40 volunteers filled public gardens and surrounding areas with pink plants in downtown Haslett, a suburb of Lansing, MI. The Invincibelle® Spirit II hydrangeas are a beautiful reminder that we are not alone in our hopes and prayers for a cure. […]

New PG Hydrangeas Excel In Performance

Panicle, PeeGee or PG hydrangeas (Hydrangea panculata) brighten up the July and August garden landscape. They’re native to China and Japan. They grow and bloom almost anywhere in the U.S. (USDA hardiness zones 3 – 8). Unlike mophead hydrangeas (H. macrophylla), that often fail in full day sun, PGs excel in 6 hours or more of sun. PG hydrangeas are vigorous growers with upright branching and coarse textured […]

Nandinas Are Never Old-fashioned

                Aka “heavenly bamboo”, nandinas (Nandina domestica) are broadleaf evergreen shrubs with several landscape attributes that include white spring flowers, color changing leathery foliage, and enormous clusters of colorful berry fruits in fall and winter (USDA hardiness zones 6-9). This member of the Barberry family (Berberidaceae) is native to Japan, China […]