Archive for the ‘Birch (Betula spp.)’ Category

Five Simple Pruning Tips For DIYers

Gardeners are frequently scared about making pruning mistakes. There are lots of gardening books filled with lots of before and after photos. Let’s face facts…your yard tree or shrub does look like the ones pictured in the pruning book. Here are my simple 5 steps for pruning: Why and When to prune: You can prune a […]

Landscape Trees With Winter Interest

Does your winter landscape look a bit shabby? This coming spring take some action by planting trees that should perk up its appearance. New tree choices should ratchet up seasonal interest, attract more bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds in the spring-summer and hungry fruit feeding birds in fall-winter. Making smart tree choices can add four-seasons of interest to your yard. […]

Tree Diversity Important In Urban Parks And Streets

              In recent years urban tree diversity has become a buzz topic. The threat of losing entire street plantings to a deadly exotic disease or pest has to often become the reality. Nearly a century ago, urban tree-lined thoroughfares were laid bare by losses of American elms (Ulmus americana) and […]

Should You Plant In Fall?

            Should you plant in the Fall? It depends what region you live in, what month in fall, and what species you’re planting. If you live in the mid-Atlantic, coastal New England, or Southeastern U.S., fall is an excellent time to set most hardy plants. Most (not all) trees, shrubs, perennials, […]

Winter Sap Bleeding From Trees Not Harmful

Winter can be a cruel period for trees. Day-night temperatures may wildly fluctuate and drying winds tend to injure tender buds. Maples (Acer spp.), flowering dogwoods (Cornus florida), birches (Betula spp.), yellowwoods (Cladrastis kentukea), walnuts (Juglans spp.) and elms (Ulmus spp.) are “bleeders”. The sap pressure inside branches is highest during the winter months. If any […]

Summer Leaf Drop From Trees

  It’s late summer in the Southern Appalachian region (USDA zones 6 and 7). Outdoor temperatures continue to hit 90°F almost daily, and weekly precipitation is low. Over the past 3-4 weeks leaves have been dropping prematurely from landscape trees. Tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera), river birch (Betula nigra), willow (Salix spp.), sycamore (Platanus x acerifolia), […]