Archive for the ‘Arborvitae (Thuja spp.)’ Category

ACS SOUTHEAST REGION CONIFER REFERENCE GARDENS*

I hear people say that conifers won’t grow in the southeastern U.S. Wanta bet! 2016 marks the 8th year of the Reference Garden program sponsored by the American Confer Society (ACS)- Southeast Region. From Kentucky and Virginia south to Florida, 19 public gardens were now participating in the program. Two of the latest additions are Brookgreen […]

Comparing Western Red Cedar And ‘Green Giant’ Arborvitaes

Western red cedar or giant red cedar (Thuja plicata) is native to the Pacific Northwest. In the eastern U.S. it is called western arborvitae and landscapers typically do not plant it. Instead, they plant the hybrid cultivar  ‘Green Giant’ arborvitae, a cross between western red cedar (T. plicata and Japanese arborvitae (T.  standishii). Western arborvitae […]

Conifers for Small Garden Spaces

Some properties can not accommodate the enormous size of tall evergreen trees. In the world of conifers, a select number of genetically dwarf species and varieties are better fits for small spaces. Most evergreens are sun lovers and require a well-drained soil. Mulching around trees and shrubs also benefits to conserve soil moisture and keep roots cool. […]

Conifers For Poorly Drained Soils

Before planting conifers in your landscape, it’s absolutely important to know the drainage (percolation rate) of the soil, particularly if it is clay-based. Most conifers prefer well-drained sandy and clay loam soils. To determine your soil type and rate of drainage, try the “hole test” recommended by Virginia Tech University horticulturists. Dig a hole approximately one foot deep […]

Emerald™ Arborvitae

Emerald™ or ‘Emerald Green’ arborvitae (Thuja occidentalis ‘Smaragd’) is not new shrub or cultivar. More than 3 generations of gardeners have used this unique form of eastern arborvitae as their “go to” evergreen shrub up and down the eastern coast and through the Midwest (USDA hardiness zones 3-7). Emerald is a semi-dwarf evergreen shrub with a […]

Trees And Shrubs That Grow In Poorly Drained Soils

If a section of your landscape is poorly drained, there are a number of trees and shrubs that will adapt over time to short periods of wet or soggy soils. Plant roots must survive in low oxygen soils. Your choices of plants are not lengthy; few landscape plants will not tolerate root suffocation for even […]

Evergreens For Wet Soggy Soils

  Most needle evergreens falter in moist soggy soils. These sites usually have a heavy clay or fine particle sand content. Some arborvitaes (Thuja spp.) and Atlantic white cedar (Chamaecyparis thyoides) tolerate temporary wet soggy conditions better than most evergreens (USDA hardiness zones 3-8). An assortment of shapes, sizes and colors are available. All are U.S. […]

Growth Rates Of Four Privacy Screen Evergreens

  In a hurry to create a little privacy from neighbors, then add a tall evergreen privacy screen to your planting chores. Four most popular conifers are rated by annual growth rate. If you recall the children tale of “The Tortoise And The Hare”, fast does not mean best. Leyland cypress (x Cupressocyparis leylandii) (zones 6-9) has the fastest growth rate at 40-50 feet […]

Autumn/Winter Garden Dressup

It’s fall and many gardeners take leave of their garden until spring. Autumn is a great time to create new color schemes that will carry over into the winter garden. It’s just like spring all over again! Frost hardy flowering plants get their turn, such as pansies, violas, snapdragons, and diascias (USDA Hardiness zone 7), […]

Landscape Shrubs Rarely Damaged By Deer

Deer will eat or nibble on any landscape plant, particularly when they’re starving. Abnormally high deer populations, starved by a shortage of their favorite foods (mast), will feed or browse on almost any plant. This is a survival reaction. To truly protect plants when deer numbers are unusually high, a tall fence or reinforced netting […]