Archive for the ‘American hornbeam’ Category

Leaf Retention In Landscape Trees

              Most deciduous landscape trees drop their leaves sometime in autumn. The physiology of autumn leaf drop is primarily stimulated by changes in photoperiod or shorter daylength. Autumn colors develop and the leaf petioles form an abscission layer. Black gum (Nyssa sylvatica), for example, start to color up in early September. Winter leaf retention by […]

Better Red Fall Leaf Color On American Hornbeam

American hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana), aka ironwood or muscle wood, grows primarily in moist, slightly acidic soils along woodland rivers and streams (USDA hardiness zones 3-9). This native hornbeam adapts to either wet or dry ground as long as soil moisture drains adequately. It copes with tough urban conditions including on non-irrigated parking lots and on […]

Too Early Fall Color A Telltale Signal Of Tree In Trouble

Early leaf color or premature leaf drop often tells a property owner that their tree(s) may not be healthy. Photo above, taken in front of a new subdivision, says alot. Large red maples show leaf color weeks ahead of their natural timeline. Notice the narrow median where the trees are planted. The cause of early […]

Add A Little Muscle To Your Landscape

Underutilized and underappreciated. That’s American hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana), aka ironwood or muscle wood. It grows primarily in moist, slightly acid soils along woodland rivers and streams. Our native hornbeam possesses the ability to adapt to a range of landscape situations. It grows equally well in full sun or partial shade. Its dark green summer foliage is rarely troubled […]