Archive for the ‘Bagworms’ Category

Comparing Western Red Cedar And ‘Green Giant’ Arborvitaes

Western red cedar or giant red cedar (Thuja plicata) is native to the Pacific Northwest. In the eastern U.S. it is called western arborvitae and landscapers typically do not plant it. Instead, they plant the hybrid cultivar  ‘Green Giant’ arborvitae, a cross between western red cedar (T. plicata and Japanese arborvitae (T.  standishii). Western arborvitae […]

Japanese Larch Is Preferred In Northern U.S.

Larches (Larix spp.) are majestic deciduous conifers in their northern ranges of their habitat (USDA hardiness zone 4 to 7). However, trees do not prosper in hot and humid summers south of USDA Zone 7. One of the best is Japanese larch (Larix kaempferi), but unfortunately, it is not commonly planted in U.S. landscapes. The tree averages 50-60 feet in height and 25-35 […]

Eastern White Pine Losses Continue

Environmental and pathogenic problems continue to take their toll on Eastern White Pine (Pinus strobus). This valued landscape and lumber tree is native in the Eastern U.S. and Canada (USDA zones 3-8). Climate change is likely contributing to recent losses of white pines due a number of serious disease and pest problems that are reducing tree numbers. Pests: A […]

Emerald™ Arborvitae

Emerald™ or ‘Emerald Green’ arborvitae (Thuja occidentalis ‘Smaragd’) is not new shrub or cultivar. More than 3 generations of gardeners have used this unique form of eastern arborvitae as their “go to” evergreen shrub up and down the eastern coast and through the Midwest (USDA hardiness zones 3-7). Emerald is a semi-dwarf evergreen shrub with a […]

Better Choices Than Leyland Cypress For Privacy Screen

For homeowners in a rush to establish a tall green privacy screen from the neighbor(s), perhaps a 12-foot tall green fence may be your better option. Among the choices of evergreens to plant, Leyland cypress (x Cupressocyperus leylandii) is fastest growing, but is plagued by any of three serious disease problems. An established leyland cypress planted 12 feet apart completely […]

Growth Rates Of Four Privacy Screen Evergreens

  In a hurry to create a little privacy from neighbors, then add a tall evergreen privacy screen to your planting chores. Four most popular conifers are rated by annual growth rate. If you recall the children tale of “The Tortoise And The Hare”, fast does not mean best. Leyland cypress (x Cupressocyparis leylandii) (zones 6-9) has the fastest growth rate at 40-50 feet […]

Pyramidal Forms Of Cryptomeria

Cryptomeria, aka Japanese cedar, (Cryptomeria japonica) is an evergreen conifer native to China and Japan. It rated to be very long-lived (USDA hardiness zones 6 to 10). Some cultivars may be hardy in 5-b as well. There are many forms of cryptomerias, ranging from dwarf globe-shaped shrubs to narrow pyramidal trees. Needle foliage may be […]

Three New Spreading Junipers Waking Up Landscapes

In times past Chinese junipers (Juniperus chinensis) were popular foundation shrubs and ground cover (USDA hardiness zones 4-9). They were popular choices in sunny locations for erosion control and around seashore areas. Three exciting cultivars have arrived on the landscape scene and should bring junipers back in vogue. Angelica Blue Chinese juniper (J. chinensis ‘Angelica […]

Bagworms Can Devastate Evergreens

Bagworms feed on more than 128 species of plants, including junipers, cedars, arborvitae and white pine. More than one year of severe defoliation will kill a formerly healthy specimen. Bagworms have one generation per year. Eggs usually hatch in mid to late May across the Southern Appalachian region (USDA zones 6 and 7). Upon hatching, […]

Privacy Screening – Avoid Using Leyland Cypress

‘Green Giant’ arborvitae and Cryptomeria (Japanese cedar) have proven more dependable over the years than Leyland cypress across Tennessee, Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina. Leyland cypress is susceptible to three serious foliar diseases. Some people love the faster growth of Leyland cypress. Leyland cypress may be weak-wooded, as reported by some gardeners this current […]