Archive for the ‘Eupatorium ‘Gateway’’ Category

Joe Pye Weed Is No Longer A “Weed”

                U.S. native Joe Pye (Eupatorium spp.), formerly “Joe Pye Weed”, has been tamed. Modern day selections grow more compact compared to 8+ feet tall wildlings that inhabit fields across eastern North America (USDA hardiness zones 4-8). Huge, terminal, domed, compound flower heads measure 12-18 inches across (depending on cultivar) and make […]

Do Not Call Them “Weeds” Any Longer

            Some plants deserve more respect. Over the years several U.S. native species have been tamed or domesticated. Yet, they retain their common name “weed”. Four popular former “weeds” are: butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa) ironweed (Vernonia lettermannii ‘Iron Butterfly’), sneezeweed (Helenium autumnale), and Joe-Pye weed (Eupatorium spp.). Butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa) […]

Attracting Monarchs To Your Garden

            From Canada to Mexico, gardeners are being recruited to halt the decline of the Monarch butterfly populations across North America. One way you can help is to fill your garden with Monarch’s favorite flowering nectar plants and milkweeds (Asclepias spp.). Plants should be sited in open full sun and […]

Expect Garden Visits From Pipevine Swallowtail

Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor) is a beautiful butterfly common over a large geographic area of North and Central America. Pipevine swallowtail can be sighted in open meadows, parks, along streams, and hopefully in your garden. The butterfly larvae (caterpillars) feed on plant members of the pipevine family (Aristolochiaceae), particularly Dutchman’s pipevine (Aristolochia spp.), including Virginia […]

Attracting Monarch Butterflies To Your Garden

From Canada to Mexico, gardeners are called upon to halt the decline of the Monarch butterfly populations across North America. The best way you can help is to fill your garden with Monarch’s favorite flowering nectar plants and milkweeds (Asclepias spp.). Plants should be sited in open full sun and moist well-drained soil. Avoid spraying […]

‘Gateway’ Joe-Pye Fits Most Gardens

On hot clammy August days, towering 6-8 feet in height, there is Joe-Pye* weed (Eupatorium purpureum) to enjoy. It is visually hard to miss when driving along rural roads in the Southern Appalachian region (USDA zones 6 and 7). Joe-Pye’s flowering sends me a timely message that autumn is only six weeks away. For gardens the cultivar […]