Archive for the ‘Astilbe (false spirea)’ Category

Tidy Up These Perennials After Blooming Is Finished

Deadheading, the practice of removing the old spent flowers from perennials, is a way to improve a garden’s appearance and reduce overcrowding. Secondarily, many (not all) will rebloom after deadheading. Not all perennials respond to deadheading by reblooming. Most daylilies (Hemerocallis x.), coralbells (Heuchera spp.), and hostas (Hosta spp.) are prime examples of perennials that do not […]

Tidying Perennials After Blooming Is Over

“Deadheading”, the practice of removing the old or spent flowers, can be utilized to improve the appearance of many perennials. These perennials do not rebloom after deadheading, but plants look alot better after the cleanup. Daylilies (Hemerocallis cv.), coral bells* (Heuchera spp.), and hostas (Hosta spp.) are prime examples of perennials that benefit from clean up after deadheading. The flower or […]

Watering Tips When Away On Vacation

Summer annuals: Hot July – August weather may demand daily or twice-daily watering for container-grown annuals. A trustworthy neighbor may have to handle these chores. Flowers and vegetables: When there is no rain within a week, water deeply any vegetables that are bearing fruits like tomato, peppers, and squash. Plants will keep producing far into […]

Past Winners of the Perennial Plant of The Year Award

Each year PPA members choose a Perennial Plant of the Year™. Since 1990 24 great plants have been selected. Some of the selection criteria include: • Suitable to a wide range of climatic conditions • Low Maintenance • Pest and disease resistant • Availability at garden centers • Multiple seasons of color (beauty) The list […]

Tough And Reliable Chinese Astilbes

Astilbes (also called “false spireas”) are favorite late spring flowering perennials.  The Astilbe x arendsii hybrids from Germany are most popular and available at local garden centers. Astilbes are very hardy in the Southern Appalachian region (USDA zones 6 and 7). If low maintenance is your goal, try Chinese astilbe (Astilbe chinensis var tacquetii). Their […]