Archive for the ‘winter injury’ Category

Causes of Sudden Leaf Scorch

Leaf scorch or foliage burn is caused primarily by environmental stress factors such as drying winds, drought, mechanical root injury, and winter injury . Natural pathogens, such as viruses, fungi, or bacteria, can be secondary causes. Spraying the wrong pesticide or accidentally allowing spray to drift onto a nearby susceptible landscape plant can result in chemical foliar […]

Tips On Growing Azaleas

Evergreen azaleas (Rhododendron spp.) are actually small-flowered rhododendrons. Depending on where you garden, azaleas enjoy a long bloom period from late March (zone 8) to June (zone 4) in the U.S. Many cultivars bloom for two weeks or more. Fall blooming types like Encore® and Bloom-a thon® series are also available. Azaleas have shallow root systems […]

Winter Daphnes Can Be A Rewarding Challenge

Native to China and Japan, winter or fragrant daphnes (Daphne odora) open to light pink or white flowers in winter and early spring in the southeastern U.S. and Pacific Northwest (USDA hardiness zones 7-9). Their welcome floral fragrance will pervade through your garden for nearly two weeks starting in late winter. Winter daphnes grow 3 to 4 […]

Eastern White Pine Losses Continue

Environmental and pathogenic problems continue to take their toll on Eastern White Pine (Pinus strobus). This valued landscape and lumber tree is native in the Eastern U.S. and Canada (USDA zones 3-8). Climate change is likely contributing to recent losses of white pines due a number of serious disease and pest problems that are reducing tree numbers. Pests: A […]

Some Zone 7 Camellias Survive In Zone 6 As Well

  A short list of early blooming Sasanqua camellias possess the  ability to do grow well in zone 6 areas. In my opinion, the zone 7 cultivar ‘Shishigashira’ steps to the head of the class. It is a November bloomer that has proven to be exceptionally cold hardy dwarf variety. The good folks at Cam Too, a camellia […]

Japanese Snowbells Worth A Try

  Japanese snowbells (Styrax japonicus) is a graceful, slow growing, low branched spring flowering tree. At present snowbells are not popular with U.S. gardeners , mostly because of unavailabliity (USDA hardiness zones 5-8). Snowbells  are lovely understory trees, similar to our native dogwoods (Cornus florida). Small, pendulous, slightly fragrant, bell-shaped white flowers appear in May. Small white […]

Recommendations On Hardy Crape Myrtles

Crape myrtles are dependable trees and shrubs in zones 7 – 10). In northern areas of USDA zone 6, a number of crape myrtle varieties (cultivars) have rated as winter hardy perennials and are not dependable woody trees or shrubs. In northeastern U.S. cities such as Philadelphia, Wilmington or Baltimore, crape myrtles are rated as hardy perennials. In […]

Paint and Wrap Newly Set Peach Tree Trunks

The bark of young peach (Prunus persica) or nectarine (P. persica nucipersica) trees are sensitive to winter injury caused by rapid drops in daily temperatures. On a winter’s day, the sun may heat up the sapwood under the thin skinned peach bark. Research in Georgia shows that temperatures on the south side of a peach tree may […]

Should You Plant In Fall?

            Should you plant in the Fall? It depends what region you live in, what month in fall, and what species you’re planting. If you live in the mid-Atlantic, coastal New England, or Southeastern U.S., fall is an excellent time to set most hardy plants. Most (not all) trees, shrubs, perennials, […]

Colorful Oleanders For Hot Summer Climes

Oleander (Nerium oleander) is an attractive evergreen shrub for warm climates. Indigenous to the Mediterranean region, it is popular in warm regions of the U.S., namely in western, coastal, and southern states (USDA hardiness zones 8-11). Oleander prefers moist, well-drained soil and a sunny landscape site. Established shrubs withstand dry and windy conditions along coastal areas. Brightly colored […]