Archive for the ‘Virus diseases’ Category

Causes of Sudden Leaf Scorch

Leaf scorch or foliage burn is caused primarily by environmental stress factors such as drying winds, drought, mechanical root injury, and winter injury . Natural pathogens, such as viruses, fungi, or bacteria, can be secondary causes. Spraying the wrong pesticide or accidentally allowing spray to drift onto a nearby susceptible landscape plant can result in chemical foliar […]

Enjoy The Double Soft Pink Flowers of Kwanzan Cherry

              Kwanzan cherry (Prunus serrulata ‘Kwanzan’) is a commonly planted Oriental cherry in the U.S. (USDA hardiness zones 5 – 8). It’s most often utilized as a small 25 to 35 foot tall flowering deciduous tree in an open lawn, patio. and deck setting for its cool summer shade. It is a […]

Fritillarias – Very Different Spring Flowering Bulb

Crown imperial (Fritillaria imperialis), aka fritillaria, is an impressive spring flowering bulb that is native of Southwestern Asia to the Himalayas (USDA hardiness zones 5-8). In late April to May, large drooping orange, red, or yellow bell-shaped flowers are topped by a small pineapple-like tufts of leaf-like bracts. The leafy fringe on top resembles a […]

Monitor And Manage Two-Spotted Spider Mites

              Two-spotted spider mites are destructive pests that ravage a wide host of shrubs and garden plants, including certain house plants, annuals, perennials, herbs and vegetables. Many evergreens are also susceptible. Two-spotted spider mites are warm season arachnids, not insects, and are exceptionally troublesome over a hot dry summer. They […]

Update: Prevention / Treatment Options For Rose Rosette Disease

Rose rosette is a devastating disease of most species of garden roses, including hybrid and shrub roses. Rose rosette disease has spread from the Rocky Mountains to the East Coast over several decades and is poised to obliterate the rose industry. To date, there is no known effective treatment. Rose rosette is caused by an […]

War On Aphids

                Aphids are pests that feed on many kinds of garden plants. These tiny insects wreak massive destruction in multiple ways. There are many different kinds (and colors) of aphids. They’re small, 1/16 inch more or less, and feed on plant sap to obtain nutrients. In greenhouses they reproduce without mating; […]

New Cannova® Cannas Worth A Try

                Cannova® Cannas (Canna x generalis) are one of a new series of seed produced hybrid cannas. In addition to profuse flowering, they’re highly rated for their compact bushy plant habit and ability to form multiple shoots. They bloom earlier and continue nonstop through summer up to first frost. Their bold, […]

Stop Inviting Critters to Your Property

Landscaping practices can influence pest populations. Old landscape timbers, particularly those that are partially rotted, may provide food for termites. powder post beetles, and carpenter ants. Numbers of millipedes, earwigs, crickets, sowbugs, and clover mite larvae may be greatly reduced if piled up old branches and boards are properly disposed of. Mosquito populations rise in wet summer weather […]

Preventing Disease Outbreaks In The Garden

              When a sick plant has been diagnosed with a viral or bacterial disease, your only option is to remove the diseased branch by pruning or destroy the entire plant. You should start out by practicing prevention. Prevention is adopting good cultural and sanitation practices. Consider the following measures: Start with disease-free […]

Crocus: A Fine Start To Spring

              Crocus (Crocus spp.) can be your wake-up reminder that winter is coming to an end (USDA hardiness zones 3- 8). They bloom in late winter (in the south); fall blooming varieties are also available. Bulbs (they’re actually “corms”) are available in flower colors from blue, purple, white, yellow, and mixed […]