Archive for the ‘root injury’ Category

How Drought Affects Our Landscape Trees*

Long term drought can be devastating on landscape and woodland trees. An environmentally stressed tree must expend additional energy to survive. Extremes of drought leads to decreases in trunk diameter and height growth, declining resistance to pests and diseases, less food production via photosynthesis, and in flower and fruit production. Symptoms of drought stress include wilted […]

Winter Daphnes Can Be A Rewarding Challenge

Native to China and Japan, winter or fragrant daphnes (Daphne odora) open to light pink or white flowers in winter and early spring in the southeastern U.S. and Pacific Northwest (USDA hardiness zones 7-9). Their welcome floral fragrance will pervade through your garden for nearly two weeks starting in late winter. Winter daphnes grow 3 to 4 […]

Controlling Rabbits In Your Garden

Rabbits make their homes in brushy areas such as along fence rows or untended areas between neighboring yards. They frequent nearby yards and gardens, perhaps your own, in search of vegetation to eat. Most people, particularly young children, adore them but a cute bunny can cause lots of damage in a flower /vegetable garden or […]

Types of Garden Irrigation

These days there are lots of choices in watering gardens, individual containers, and newly planted trees. Before setting your flowers or veggies, install drip lines or soaker hoses. These systems are the most efficient method of watering and put less hurt on your water bill. Drip systems deliver water at ground level and do not wet the […]

Fritillarias – Very Different Spring Flowering Bulb

Crown imperial (Fritillaria imperialis), aka fritillaria, is an impressive spring flowering bulb that is native of Southwestern Asia to the Himalayas (USDA hardiness zones 5-8). In late April to May, large drooping orange, red, or yellow bell-shaped flowers are topped by a small pineapple-like tufts of leaf-like bracts. The leafy fringe on top resembles a […]

Butterfly Weed – Long-lived Flowering Perennial That Nourish Monarchs

Milkweed (Asclepias tuberosa), aka butterfly weed, is a tuberous rooted perennial native in the Eastern and southern U.S. (USDA hardiness zones 3 to 9). It grows in dry/rocky open woodlands, prairies, farm fields, and along roadsides. Individual plants typically grow as a clump to 1- 3 feet high and 1 ½ feet wide. Unlike many of […]

Should You Plant In Fall?

            Should you plant in the Fall? It depends what region you live in, what month in fall, and what species you’re planting. If you live in the mid-Atlantic, coastal New England, or Southeastern U.S., fall is an excellent time to set most hardy plants. Most (not all) trees, shrubs, perennials, […]

Trees And Shrubs That Grow In Poorly Drained Soils

If a section of your landscape is poorly drained, there are a number of trees and shrubs that will adapt over time to short periods of wet or soggy soils. Plant roots must survive in low oxygen soils. Your choices of plants are not lengthy; few landscape plants will not tolerate root suffocation for even […]

DOs and DON’Ts Checklist Before Purchasing Plants

When shopping at the garden center don’t bring home problem plants. “Plants On Sale” should raise a caution flag. Thoroughly inspect all sale plants. They may have been sitting many months with the pots now full of weeds, diseases, or pest problems. They become tightly potbound and roots will need to be teased apart prior […]

Why Some Crapemyrtles Do Not Flower

There are several probable reasons why your crape myrtle did not flower this summer. The two leading reasons are lack of adequate daily sunlight and planting depth. Crape myrtles should be planted in full sun. They don’t flower well in locations receiving less than 6 hours of direct sunlight each day. If the leaves are […]