Archive for the ‘Powdery mildew’ Category

Halloween Pumpkins And Gourds

It’s Pumpkin Time!…celebration of Halloween across America. A local pumpkin farm had over 60 kinds of pumpkins to choose from. According to the Missouri Botanical Gardens website: “the term pumpkin really has no botanical meaning”. Pumpkins and gourds are classified as squashes in the Cucurbitaceae family along with cucumbers and melons. If you want to grow […]

Don’t Totally Dislike All Box Elder Trees

Box elder (Acer negundo) is a native fast-growing and suckering medium-sized tree (USDA hardiness zones 4b-8).  Branches are weak wooded and easily damaged in wind and ice storms. Box elder grows almost anywhere in any average soil, medium to wet, and in full sun. The species fails on a shady site. This weedy maple is […]

Best of MT Cuba Center 2017 Monarda Study*

Monarda, commonly known as bee balm or wild bergamot, is a popular summer flowering perennial. Their large, brightly colored flower clusters brighten the season. Flowers attract many types of wildlife, including hummingbirds, bees, butterflies, moths, and seed-eating birds. Unfortunately, many cultivars are susceptible to powdery mildew disease which causes defoliation and plant loss. Over the past three […]

Enjoy The Double Soft Pink Flowers of Kwanzan Cherry

              Kwanzan cherry (Prunus serrulata ‘Kwanzan’) is a commonly planted Oriental cherry in the U.S. (USDA hardiness zones 5 – 8). It’s most often utilized as a small 25 to 35 foot tall flowering deciduous tree in an open lawn, patio. and deck setting for its cool summer shade. It is a […]

Stop The “Crape Murder”

In Tennessee (where I live) and in the Southeastern U.S., bad crape myrtle (Lagerstroemia x) pruning continues to be done by professional landscapers and homeowners (USDA hardiness zones 6-9). This practice, also called “topping”, reduces tree (or shrub) height. Over 25 years, Southern Living magazine called this “crape murder”. Crape murder is not going away. More crape […]

Powdery Mildew Disease Resistant Cultivars

Gardeners have learned to associate certain plants with a troublesome disease(s). Powdery and downy mildews have become epidemic in many regions of the U.S. Best ways for managing mildew diseases are prevention, good cultural practices, and spraying.. First, avoid planting susceptible cultivars. Plant in the proper location and space plants far enough apart so they’re not touching. Surrounding […]

Types of Garden Irrigation

These days there are lots of choices in watering gardens, individual containers, and newly planted trees. Before setting your flowers or veggies, install drip lines or soaker hoses. These systems are the most efficient method of watering and put less hurt on your water bill. Drip systems deliver water at ground level and do not wet the […]

Some Zone 7 Camellias Survive In Zone 6 As Well

  A short list of early blooming Sasanqua camellias possess the  ability to do grow well in zone 6 areas. In my opinion, the zone 7 cultivar ‘Shishigashira’ steps to the head of the class. It is a November bloomer that has proven to be exceptionally cold hardy dwarf variety. The good folks at Cam Too, a camellia […]

Bedding Geraniums Excel In Cool Weather

                Over the past decade, the zonal or bedding class of geraniums (Pelargonium x hortorum) have become summer favorites in northern gardens (USDA hardiness zones 3-7). Geraniums thrive in cool weather, but are also widely planted in zones 9-10 gardens where winter temperatures are moderate. Increasing numbers of colorful varieties beautify flower beds and container gardens. Leaves are […]

Asian Pears Becoming Very Popular

Whether home-grown or store bought, Asian pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) fruits ripen sweet and tasty on the tree (USDA hardiness zones 4-9). There are over 100 varieties available worldwide, many with difficult to pronounce. Investigate variety cold hardiness and winter chilling rating as some cultivars are hardier than others. Southern varieties require only 300- 600 hours of winter chilling temperatures […]