Archive for the ‘Insect (Pest) Problems’ Category

Five Simple Pruning Tips For DIYers

Gardeners are frequently scared about making pruning mistakes. There are lots of gardening books filled with lots of before and after photos. Let’s face facts…your yard tree or shrub does look like the ones pictured in the pruning book. Here are my simple 5 steps for pruning: Why and When to prune: You can prune a […]

Japanese Larch Is Preferred In Northern U.S.

Larches (Larix spp.) are majestic deciduous conifers in their northern ranges of their habitat (USDA hardiness zone 4 to 7). However, trees do not prosper in hot and humid summers south of USDA Zone 7. One of the best is Japanese larch (Larix kaempferi), but unfortunately, it is not commonly planted in U.S. landscapes. The tree averages 50-60 feet in height and 25-35 […]

Eastern White Pine Losses Continue

Environmental and pathogenic problems continue to take their toll on Eastern White Pine (Pinus strobus). This valued landscape and lumber tree is native in the Eastern U.S. and Canada (USDA zones 3-8). Climate change is likely contributing to recent losses of white pines due a number of serious disease and pest problems that are reducing tree numbers. Pests: A […]

Fascinated By Praying Mantis

Carolina Praying Mantis (often written “mantid”, referring to family Mantidae) (Stagmomantis carolina) is the only species of praying mantis native to the U.S. However, about 20 species are found in the U.S.  Most ubiquitous here is the European mantis (M. religiosa). Chinese Praying Mantid (Tenodera aridifolia) is the largest species by size in the U.S., measuring […]

August Is Also An Important Planting Month

“A” starts the alphabet. To most gardeners April starts out the spring planting season. Temperatures are in the comfortable 70°F degree range. Four months later in August, temperatures outside are sweltering. Many of us call them the hot humid “dog days” of August. Dogs and gardeners are suffering alike. However, August is also a great time […]

Dreaded Japanese Beetles Are Back

In many areas of the Eastern U.S. Japanese beetles (JB) devastate the foliage, fruits and flowers of more than 300 plant species, particularly those in the rose family (Rosaceae). Adult beetles are approximately 3/8 inches in length with a dark metallic green head and metallic dark tan wings. In the soil JB grubs appear “C” […]

“Neo-Nicotinoid Free” — What Does This Means”

Earlier this year several big box store and regional independent garden center chains announced that the plants they sell in 2016 will be “neonicotinoid-free”. Large regional nurseries and greenhouse operations are also jumping on-board the anti-neonic bandwagon. This means that pesticides containing the ingredient acetamiprid and imidacloprid are members of the neonicotinoid class, and are forbidden to […]

War On Aphids

                Aphids are pests that feed on many kinds of garden plants. These tiny insects wreak massive destruction in multiple ways. There are many different kinds (and colors) of aphids. They’re small, 1/16 inch more or less, and feed on plant sap to obtain nutrients. In greenhouses they reproduce without mating; […]

Patio Peach Blooms In Early Spring

  For small garden spaces patio peach (Prunus persica) is a gem. This miniature tree bears long narrow lush green (or reddish) foliage. Site selection is crucial to ward off potential disease and insect problems. Patio peach is a genetic dwarf and may be grown in a large container on your deck or patio. Tree height averages 6-8 feet tall […]

Peace Lily And Anthurium Plants Around Home Or Office

            Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum) and anthurium are near perfect foliage plants in poorly lit areas around your home or office. They’re native to the tropical rainforests of Central and South America. Both plants are shade-lovers in their native habitats. Direct sunlight for more than one hour will likely burn leaves. They’re members […]