Archive for the ‘Insect (Pest) Problems’ Category

Tis The Season For Ornamental Kales and Cabbages

Ornamental cabbage and kale (Brassica oleracea) are very close related to the same vegetables that we eat at our kitchen table. They are edible, just not as tasty. Plants are biennials, e.g. they produce leaves one year and flower the following spring. Ornamental kales have deeply cut serrated or ruffled leaves while leaves of ornamental cabbage […]

‘Youngii’ White Bark Birch A Novelty Tree For Small Spaces

Young’s Weeping European Birch (Betula pendula ‘Youngii’) is small graceful tree with willowy pendulous branches (USDA hardiness zones 3-6). Nurseries often train the very pliable branches and trunk of grafted seedlings into unique novelty shapes. Plant this miniature 12 to 20 feet tree specimen near a deck or patio where it should receive mostly morning sunlight. Fall foliage turns […]

First Days Of Fall…. Bring In Your House Plants

The final days are summer are over. It’s time to move your tropical plants indoors before night temps in the low 40°F arrive. These plants thrive outdoors in summer temperatures and high humidity, but cannot survive being left outdoors. Container plants such as Ficus (rubber) trees, orchids, Norfolk Island pines, scheffleras, bromeliads, gardenias, palms, and […]

Pest Alert – Emerald Ash Borer Update

  Recent news about Emerald Ash Borer continues not to be good. Almost weekly, state officials report the spread of this pest in their state. Emerald ash borer (EAB) is an invasive metallic wood boring or flat-headed wood boring beetle that is killing all species of North American ash trees (Fraxinus spp.). Since 2002, EAB has […]

Don’t Totally Dislike All Box Elder Trees

Box elder (Acer negundo) is a native fast-growing and suckering medium-sized tree (USDA hardiness zones 4b-8).  Branches are weak wooded and easily damaged in wind and ice storms. Box elder grows almost anywhere in any average soil, medium to wet, and in full sun. The species fails on a shady site. This weedy maple is […]

Gardenias Continue To Disappoint In The Mid-South

The lure of fragrant white flowers have mid-South gardeners (zones 6 and 7) wanting to grow gardenias (Gardenia jasminoides). New cultivars, supposedly hardier than previous ones, hit garden centers every spring. Unfortunately, zones 6 and 7 winters usually prove them wrong. Recent purchases of new cultivars ‘Frostproof’ and Pinwheel® and older selection ‘Kleim’s Hardy’ have […]

Enjoy The Double Soft Pink Flowers of Kwanzan Cherry

              Kwanzan cherry (Prunus serrulata ‘Kwanzan’) is a commonly planted Oriental cherry in the U.S. (USDA hardiness zones 5 – 8). It’s most often utilized as a small 25 to 35 foot tall flowering deciduous tree in an open lawn, patio. and deck setting for its cool summer shade. It is a […]

Five Simple Pruning Tips For DIYers

Gardeners are frequently scared about making pruning mistakes. There are lots of gardening books filled with lots of before and after photos. Let’s face facts…your yard tree or shrub does look like the ones pictured in the pruning book. Here are my simple 5 steps for pruning: Why and When to prune: You can prune a […]

Japanese Larch Is Preferred In Northern U.S.

Larches (Larix spp.) are majestic deciduous conifers in their northern ranges of their habitat (USDA hardiness zone 4 to 7). However, trees do not prosper in hot and humid summers south of USDA Zone 7. One of the best is Japanese larch (Larix kaempferi), but unfortunately, it is not commonly planted in U.S. landscapes. The tree averages 50-60 feet in height and 25-35 […]

Eastern White Pine Losses Continue

Environmental and pathogenic problems continue to take their toll on Eastern White Pine (Pinus strobus). This valued landscape and lumber tree is native in the Eastern U.S. and Canada (USDA zones 3-8). Climate change is likely contributing to recent losses of white pines due a number of serious disease and pest problems that are reducing tree numbers. Pests: A […]