Archive for the ‘Wildlife attractant’ Category

Controlling Rabbits In Your Garden

Rabbits make their homes in brushy areas such as along fence rows or untended areas between neighboring yards. They frequent nearby yards and gardens, perhaps your own, in search of vegetation to eat. Most people, particularly young children, adore them but a cute bunny can cause lots of damage in a flower /vegetable garden or […]

Deerproofing

            Deer love to eat most of the flowers, plants and trees in your garden. To discourage deer from eating your garden, you basically have three (3) options. Construct a Barrier or Fence. Make your garden unpleasant for deer. Choose plants that deer don’t like. Deer Barriers and Fences Deer can jump an […]

Monarch Tagging Program*

*Blog is guest authored by Joy Stewart, University of Tennessee Master Gardener. She lives in Bristol, TN. For such a small creature, weighing in at only half a gram, the Monarch butterfly has almost more remarkable facts and puzzling mysteries attached to it than one can count.  No other butterfly in the world migrates like […]

Five Landscape Plants On The Gardeners’ Taboo List

To many people, maintaining a garden or landscape means a lot of hard work. Sometimes the weeds outgrow what you have planted. Some landscape plants promise a lot of beauty but deliver nothing but problems. Some trees are weak wooded, prone to pests or diseases, and outgrow their space. Some produce smelly odorous flowers. I urge […]

Celebrate National Pollinator Week

            June 20 – 26 is National Pollinator Week. National Pollinator Week is a time to celebrate pollinators and spread the word about what you can do to protect them. Nine years ago the U.S. Senate unanimous approved and designated a week in June as “National Pollinator Week”. National Pollinator Week is […]

Buttonbush Offers Year-round Interest

              Buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis), aka Button-willow or Honey Bells, is a medium to large native shrub with many fine landscape attributes. This unique flowering shrub is a favorite in attracting beneficial wildlife. It populates bogs, swamps and pond areas, as well as dry limestone bluffs in the eastern U.S. […]

Asian Pears Becoming Very Popular

Whether home-grown or store bought, Asian pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) fruits ripen sweet and tasty on the tree (USDA hardiness zones 4-9). There are over 100 varieties available worldwide, many with difficult to pronounce. Investigate variety cold hardiness and winter chilling rating as some cultivars are hardier than others. Southern varieties require only 300- 600 hours of winter chilling temperatures […]

American Holly For Year-round Interest

American Holly (Ilex opaca) is a pyramidal evergreen tree that deserves to be planted more for multiple reasons. It is native to the eastern and central U. S. and is easily identified by its spiny green leaves (USDA hardiness zones 5 to 9). It grows slowly to 15 to 35 feet, sometimes taller.  The leathery, deep […]

Stop Inviting Critters to Your Property

Landscaping practices can influence pest populations. Old landscape timbers, particularly those that are partially rotted, may provide food for termites. powder post beetles, and carpenter ants. Numbers of millipedes, earwigs, crickets, sowbugs, and clover mite larvae may be greatly reduced if piled up old branches and boards are properly disposed of. Mosquito populations rise in wet summer weather […]

Selecting Japanese Maple Varieties For Winter Hardiness

              Japanese maples (Acer palmatum) and (A. japonicum) are among the most picturesque of trees and shrubs. Their star-shaped leaves are comprised of 5-7-9 pointed lobes, depending on variety (cultivar). Trees exhibit layered branching, cascading form, lacy foliage (dissectum types), and stunning fall color. There are countless numbers of cultivars… […]