Archive for the ‘Staking’ Category

Four Top Rated Coreopsis You Should Know About

Coreopsis (Coreopsis spp.) are flowering perennials (and annuals) native to the eastern U.S. In 2016, MT Cuba Center* in Greenville, Delaware reported on the overall garden performance of 13 species and related cultivars and hybrids in the Mid-Atlantic region. Over a period of 3 years, the MT Cuba staff evaluated habit, floral display, disease resistance, […]

Sorting Through The Joe Pye Cultivars

Joe Pye weed (Eutrichum purpureum) is a native perennial commonly spotted onthe edge of farm fields in the eastern and northern U.S. (USDA hardiness zones 4 to 9). The wild species grows 5-7 feet high and 2-4 feet wide. It blooms from late July to September and is a magnet to attract bees and butterflies. Over the past two […]

Spring – Summer Care of Herbaceous Peonies After Flowering

Summer weather can be tough on the foliage of tree and herbaceous peonies tree (P. lactiflora). Here are some tips to ensure your peony plants will prosper for many years to come. Keep foliage disease-free and prune off all badly infected with mildew or black spotted.  Some varieties naturally shed their leaves (go dormant) early. Itoh hybrids and most […]

Exceptionally Hardy ‘Margarita’ Carolina Yellow Jessamine

Carolina yellow jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens) is a lovely ignored native vine. It is native from Virginia to Texas to Florida, easily spotted growing in a sunny location growing on trees (USDA zones 6-9). It is the state flower of South Carolina. Grow it as a trellised vine or as a low shrub-like mound (ground cover). Flowers often serve as an early call […]

Transform These Three Shrubs Into Trees

Some large shrubs can be trained into lovely small flowering trees. These three flowering shrubs may be trained into small 15-25 feet tall, single or multi- trunk trees: Siebold viburnum (Viburnum sieboldii) is a tall upright branched deciduous shrub (USDA hardiness zones 4-7). This native from Japan grows to 15-20 feet tall and 10-15 feet wide […]

Growing Amaryllis

    Amaryllis is a tropical bulb that blooms indoors usually in winter (USDA hardiness zones 9-11). It is one of the easiest flowering plants to grow. Everything you need to enjoy a bouquet of big, beautiful flowers is inside the bulb. Simply plant the pre-chilled bulb in a container and add water. There are many […]

Fritillarias – Very Different Spring Flowering Bulb

Crown imperial (Fritillaria imperialis), aka fritillaria, is an impressive spring flowering bulb that is native of Southwestern Asia to the Himalayas (USDA hardiness zones 5-8). In late April to May, large drooping orange, red, or yellow bell-shaped flowers are topped by a small pineapple-like tufts of leaf-like bracts. The leafy fringe on top resembles a […]

Spider Flowers Excel In Summer’s Heat And Humidity

Spider flowers (Cleome x hybrida) are top performing summer flowering annuals. Each year plant breeders introduce compact varieties to beautify flower beds and container gardens. Select among vegetative and seed produced types. Spider flowers ask for weekly watering and full day sunlight (best)  to achieve maximum blooming potential. They will grow in a partially shaded beds but bloom less and the plants tend to […]

Do Not Call Them “Weeds” Any Longer

            Some plants deserve more respect. Over the years several U.S. native species have been tamed or domesticated. Yet, they retain their common name “weed”. Four popular former “weeds” are: butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa) ironweed (Vernonia lettermannii ‘Iron Butterfly’), sneezeweed (Helenium autumnale), and Joe-Pye weed (Eupatorium spp.). Butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa) […]

Tips On Growing Delphiniums

  Modern day delphiniums (Delphinium spp.), also called larkspurs, are the result of 2 centuries of complex breeding efforts in Europe and U.S. Delphiniums are short-lived perennials, at their best for 2-3 years. They’re most attuned to the cool temperate climes of the northern U.S. Delphiniums belong in the Buttercup (Ranunculaceae) family (USDA hardiness zones […]