Archive for the ‘Soil pH’ Category

Comparing Western Red Cedar And ‘Green Giant’ Arborvitaes

Western red cedar or giant red cedar (Thuja plicata) is native to the Pacific Northwest. In the eastern U.S. it is called western arborvitae and landscapers typically do not plant it. Instead, they plant the hybrid cultivar  ‘Green Giant’ arborvitae, a cross between western red cedar (T. plicata and Japanese arborvitae (T.  standishii). Western arborvitae […]

Are Your Plants Deficient In Magnesium?

Magnesium (Mg) is the central element involved in chlorophyll synthesis, a crucial nutrient in photosynthesis, and in maintaining vibrant green leaves. Like calcium, magnesium is required by plants in large enough quantities. It is a “macro-nutrient”, as important as nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K), the latter three adsorbed by plants in greater amounts. Magnesium […]

American Witchhazel Blooms in Autumn

American witchhazel (Hamamelis virginiana) is the last native flowering plants to bloom in the calendar year. It is a deciduous shrub or small tree, native to woodlands, forest margins and stream banks in eastern North America (USDA hardiness zones 3-8). It typically grows 15-20 feet tall as a multi-stemmed shrub and 30 feet tall in tree form. Beginning in […]

Longwood’s Chrysanthemum Festival

  As fall mums are finishing up in our gardens, Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square, PA has debut their annual chrysanthemum display in the Conservatory. More than 17,000 chrysanthemums were nurtured and trained, some for more than a year by their talented horticultural staff to resemble balls, spirals, columns, pagodas, and more. It is the […]

Conifers for Small Garden Spaces

Some properties can not accommodate the enormous size of tall evergreen trees. In the world of conifers, a select number of genetically dwarf species and varieties are better fits for small spaces. Most evergreens are sun lovers and require a well-drained soil. Mulching around trees and shrubs also benefits to conserve soil moisture and keep roots cool. […]

Happidaze® Sweetgum Produces No Gumballs

  Sweet gum (Liquidambar styraciflua) is a low-maintenance deciduous shade tree. The species is native from Connecticut to Florida and west to Missouri and south to Texas and Mexico (USDA hardiness zones 5 – 9). A popular landscape shade tree, it typically grows to 60 to 80 feet tall with a straight central trunk. A young […]

Seven Ideas for Managing Mosses in Lawn Areas

Mosses, over 14,000 species of them worldwide, are major competitors with lawn grasses in certain landscape situations. They belong to their own plant family. They photosynthesize and draw moisture from tiny rhizoids (primitive root systems). They do not compete for soil nutrients with lawn grasses. Some can live in full sun, other kinds in shade […]

Mapleleaf Viburnum For Woodland Areas

The genus Viburnum is a rich source of over 150 species of great flowering shrubs worldwide. Many viburnums are native to North America including mapleleaf viburnum (Viburnum acerifolium). This totally underutilized deciduous viburnum is a great choice to plant in shrub borders, foundation, or hedging, as well as to naturalize in an open woodland area (zone 3-8). Shrub grows 4 – […]

Starting Oak Trees From Acorns

              Acorns begin ripening and falling from oak trees (Quercus spp.) anytime from late August until mid-November. Ripening dates vary from one year to the next. Harvest the healthy plump acorns, either off the tree or from the ground. Remove and dispose of the cap. If you have collected several […]

Fritillarias – Very Different Spring Flowering Bulb

Crown imperial (Fritillaria imperialis), aka fritillaria, is an impressive spring flowering bulb that is native of Southwestern Asia to the Himalayas (USDA hardiness zones 5-8). In late April to May, large drooping orange, red, or yellow bell-shaped flowers are topped by a small pineapple-like tufts of leaf-like bracts. The leafy fringe on top resembles a […]