Archive for the ‘Soil Conservation’ Category

Three Native Landscape Grasses To Try

These three native grasses are easy to establish in average, dry to medium moist, well-drained soils and in full sun. They tolerate a wide range of soils including dry rocky sites, and are exceptionally drought tolerant. Figure on 1 to 2 years for each to become fully established. Blue Lyme Grass (Leymus arenarus ‘Blue Dune’) is a vigorous spreading cool […]

Urban Trees Reap Cleaner Air

U.S. Forest Service scientists with the Center for Urban Forest Research report that planting and nurturing street trees in Indianapolis, IN returned 500 percent in benefits from storm water reduction, energy conservation, cleaner air and increased property values. The researchers evaluated more than 117,000 trees the city’s Parks and Recreation Forestry Section manages. It found […]

Summer Chocolate™ Mimosa Tree Worth A Try

Mimosa tree (Albizia julibrissin) is treasured as a four month landscape tree for its tropical-like foliage and flowering. This small deciduous tree grows 20 to 25 feet tall and its horizontal branching reaches out widely. Mimosa leafs out in late May with lush green, tropical-looking pinnately compound foliage and growth is very rapid. From mid-June […]

Three Mid-sized Ornamental Grasses for Small Gardens

For their sheer architecture alone, ornamental grasses provide 4- seasons of landscape excitement. Within a small garden space three mid-sized (4 – 6 feet tall) ornamental grasses with awesome vertical stature excel. All are highly rated for long garden life and low annual maintenance. ‘Karl Foerster’ Feather Reed Grass (Calamagrostis x acutiflora ) forms silvery […]

Recycle Live Christmas Trees

The holidays are over. This year take your live Christmas tree to a designated location to be recycled. Many cities and towns collect trees which are chipped into mulch. The mulch is spread around municipal park trees and street trees.  It is utilized for erosion management along stream banks and on steep slopes. Mulch is also distributed to gardeners in the spring. Communities pile […]