Archive for the ‘Propagation (dividing)’ Category

Arctic Fire™ Dogwood Brightens Up Winter Landscape

Red-twig or red osier dogwood (Cornus stolonifera) is a native shrub (USDA hardiness zones 2-7). It reaches 8 to 10 feet in height and roots sucker prolifically. It can become a chore keeping it contained in small garden spaces. Arctic Fire™ is a superior cultivar identified by its fiery red stems and compact growth habit. Expect […]

Old-Fashioned Snake Plants

Snake plant (Sansevieria spp.), aka Mother-In-Law’s Tongue, is an easy to grow succulent. It is one of the hardest house plants to kill, grows in almost any room of your home, and demands little attention except an occasional watering. Its leathery sword-shape leaves are usually marked in gray green marbling. Some varieties may be edged in yellow […]

Growing Amaryllis

    Amaryllis is a tropical bulb that blooms indoors usually in winter (USDA hardiness zones 9-11). It is one of the easiest flowering plants to grow. Everything you need to enjoy a bouquet of big, beautiful flowers is inside the bulb. Simply plant the pre-chilled bulb in a container and add water. There are many […]

‘Midwinter Fire’ Dogwood Brightens Up The Winter Landscape

Bloodtwig dogwood (Cornus sanguinea), indigenous to Europe and Asia, is an upright branched, round-topped, spreading deciduous shrub (USDA hardiness zones 5 to 7). In the wild the species matures to 8-15 feet in height and spread. Its common name “bloodtwig” is misleading. Winter wood on 1-2 year old branches is not red. Instead, winter stems turn […]

Blue Lyme Grass Adapts To Almost Any Surroundings

Blue Lyme Grass (Leymus arenarus ‘Blue Dune’) is a vigorous spreading cool season grass (USDA Hardiness zones 3-9). It is native to the coasts of northern and western Europe. A closely related species, L. mollis, is native to the northern coasts of North America. Blue lyme grass is a stand out because of its beautiful steel-blue foliage. Atlanta Botanical Gardens has sited it […]

Fritillarias – Very Different Spring Flowering Bulb

Crown imperial (Fritillaria imperialis), aka fritillaria, is an impressive spring flowering bulb that is native of Southwestern Asia to the Himalayas (USDA hardiness zones 5-8). In late April to May, large drooping orange, red, or yellow bell-shaped flowers are topped by a small pineapple-like tufts of leaf-like bracts. The leafy fringe on top resembles a […]

Avoiding Slug Problems On Hostas

  Finding slug resistance among hosta varieties is relative. By late summer, you will find some holes in leaves in almost every variety, some a lot worst than others. There are ways to reduce slug injury in your host plantings. Weather is a key factor. Wet summers means higher slug and snail populations. Dry summers is […]

Japanese Asters (Kalimeris) Are Summer-blooming Gems

Double Japanese asters (Kalimeris pinnatifida) are not true asters. They bloom in summer unlike the more popular fall blooming asters (Symphyotrichum spp.). Essentially, the genus Kalimeris (from Asia) and Boltonia (U.S. native) are closely related and used interchangeably. ‘Pinnatifida’ is without question the best known cultivar. In August the plant is smothered with 1-inch diameter semi-double white daisy flowers […]

Do Not Call Them “Weeds” Any Longer

            Some plants deserve more respect. Over the years several U.S. native species have been tamed or domesticated. Yet, they retain their common name “weed”. Four popular former “weeds” are: butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa) ironweed (Vernonia lettermannii ‘Iron Butterfly’), sneezeweed (Helenium autumnale), and Joe-Pye weed (Eupatorium spp.). Butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa) […]

Comparing Oriental Lilies To Asiatic Lilies

Both Asiatic and Oriental lilies (Lilium spp.) are popular lilies in U.S. gardens. Hybrid cultivars share traits of both species. Lilies grow in a wide variety of soil types and are not pH sensitive. They flower in full to part partial sun (5 hours minimum of sunlight).  Both prefer a well-drained soil and mulch to keep roots […]