Archive for the ‘Pesticide recommendations’ Category

Powdery Mildew Disease Resistant Cultivars

Gardeners have learned to associate certain plants with a troublesome disease(s). Powdery and downy mildews have become epidemic in many regions of the U.S. Best ways for managing mildew diseases are prevention, good cultural practices, and spraying.. First, avoid planting susceptible cultivars. Plant in the proper location and space plants far enough apart so they’re not touching. Surrounding […]

Shopping Tips When Purchasing Plants

    Spring and fall are excellent planting times and buying opportunities. A trips to a garden center can be very costly unless you go prepared. Here are some practical tips to make those shopping trips more enjoyable and a lot less expensive. Create your landscape plan first before buying plants. First, visit garden centers to pick up great landscaping ideas […]

Fine Tuning Growing Calamondin Orange In The Home

Calamondin orange (Citris mitis) is challenging to grow in a home environment. It is hardy to 20°F., more than most other true citrus (USDA hardiness zone 8). It does not grow well in temperatures below 45ºF. In temperate regions calamondin spends the active growing months (May – October) outdoors either in direct sunlight (in northern areas) and in half day shade (in […]

Eastern White Pine Losses Continue

Environmental and pathogenic problems continue to take their toll on Eastern White Pine (Pinus strobus). This valued landscape and lumber tree is native in the Eastern U.S. and Canada (USDA zones 3-8). Climate change is likely contributing to recent losses of white pines due a number of serious disease and pest problems that are reducing tree numbers. Pests: A […]

Pest Alert: Viburnum Leaf Beetle May Be Invading

Viburnum Leaf Beetle is gradually coming to the Southeastern U.S. It was first found in upstate New York in 1996. This pest has been on the move, eating its way through native viburnums from upstate New York to northern Pennsylvania to western Maryland. It feeds only on viburnum species. Preferred species include native arrowwood viburnum (V. dentatum), […]

Flowering Cabbage and Kale For Autumn Gardens

            Creating both edible and ornamentally pleasing vegetables has been a goal of plant breeders. Flowering cabbage and kale (Brassica oleracea) are a new landscaping niche in the autumn garden. Plants develop huge leafy rosettes and eventually form heads. Color patterns on leaves include white, cream, red and purple shades. The […]

Dreaded Japanese Beetles Are Back

In many areas of the Eastern U.S. Japanese beetles (JB) devastate the foliage, fruits and flowers of more than 300 plant species, particularly those in the rose family (Rosaceae). Adult beetles are approximately 3/8 inches in length with a dark metallic green head and metallic dark tan wings. In the soil JB grubs appear “C” […]

“Neo-Nicotinoid Free” — What Does This Means”

Earlier this year several big box store and regional independent garden center chains announced that the plants they sell in 2016 will be “neonicotinoid-free”. Large regional nurseries and greenhouse operations are also jumping on-board the anti-neonic bandwagon. This means that pesticides containing the ingredient acetamiprid and imidacloprid are members of the neonicotinoid class, and are forbidden to […]

Monitor And Manage Two-Spotted Spider Mites

              Two-spotted spider mites are destructive pests that ravage a wide host of shrubs and garden plants, including certain house plants, annuals, perennials, herbs and vegetables. Many evergreens are also susceptible. Two-spotted spider mites are warm season arachnids, not insects, and are exceptionally troublesome over a hot dry summer. They […]

War On Aphids

                Aphids are pests that feed on many kinds of garden plants. These tiny insects wreak massive destruction in multiple ways. There are many different kinds (and colors) of aphids. They’re small, 1/16 inch more or less, and feed on plant sap to obtain nutrients. In greenhouses they reproduce without mating; […]