Archive for the ‘deadheading’ Category

Landscaping Plantings Around A Garden Railroad

      Garden railroad layouts are becoming more popular. A number of dwarf and compact growing plants play a major role in landscaping around the layout. Many miniature forms of taller varieties are available. Here are several great plant choices to add the your garden railroad: Trees and Shrubs – offer scale or tall canopy […]

Polar Express Sunbelt Rose Big Winner At 2016 Biltmore Gardens Rose Trial

If you grow roses in the U.S. Mid-South region, the historic Biltmore Gardens in Asheville, NC is key source for discovering what varieties you should be growing. Recently, a jury of world rose experts selected the winning roses in the 2016 Biltmore International Rose Trials. Since 2011, Biltmore’s historic Rose Garden has been home to the trials in which more […]

Garden Phlox – Select Mildew Resistant Varieties

              Garden phlox (Phlox paniculata), aka summer phlox, is native from New York to Iowa south to Georgia, Mississippi and Arkansas (USDA hardiness zones 4 to 8(9)). They are valued for their long beautiful floral display and fragrance. In the wild phlox grow it in moist, rich open woodlands, […]

Need To Deadhead Perennials

Deadheading is the practice of removing spent blossoms to stimulate re-blooming. It also refreshes the plant’s appearance, and lessens the threat of seed dispersal. It redirects the plant’s energy from seed production to root and shoot growth. Deadheading is an extra chore throughout the growing season. When the plant (perennial or annual) has stopped blooming or […]

Do Not Call Them “Weeds” Any Longer

            Some plants deserve more respect. Over the years several U.S. native species have been tamed or domesticated. Yet, they retain their common name “weed”. Four popular former “weeds” are: butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa) ironweed (Vernonia lettermannii ‘Iron Butterfly’), sneezeweed (Helenium autumnale), and Joe-Pye weed (Eupatorium spp.). Butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa) […]

Comparing Oriental Lilies To Asiatic Lilies

Both Asiatic and Oriental lilies (Lilium spp.) are popular lilies in U.S. gardens. Hybrid cultivars share traits of both species. Lilies grow in a wide variety of soil types and are not pH sensitive. They flower in full to part partial sun (5 hours minimum of sunlight).  Both prefer a well-drained soil and mulch to keep roots […]

Yarrows Come In Many Size And Colors

              Yarrow (Achillea millefolium) is a rhizomatous spreading perennial (USDA hardiness zones 3 to 9). The species originates from Europe and Asia and was introduced to America in colonial times. Today, yarrow is frequently seen naturalized along roadsides, fields, and gardens throughout the U. S. Yarrow has fern-like, aromatic, foliage. […]

Tips On Growing Delphiniums

  Modern day delphiniums (Delphinium spp.), also called larkspurs, are the result of 2 centuries of complex breeding efforts in Europe and U.S. Delphiniums are short-lived perennials, at their best for 2-3 years. They’re most attuned to the cool temperate climes of the northern U.S. Delphiniums belong in the Buttercup (Ranunculaceae) family (USDA hardiness zones […]

Bedding Geraniums Excel In Cool Weather

                Over the past decade, the zonal or bedding class of geraniums (Pelargonium x hortorum) have become summer favorites in northern gardens (USDA hardiness zones 3-7). Geraniums thrive in cool weather, but are also widely planted in zones 9-10 gardens where winter temperatures are moderate. Increasing numbers of colorful varieties beautify flower beds and container gardens. Leaves are […]

New Cannova® Cannas Worth A Try

                Cannova® Cannas (Canna x generalis) are one of a new series of seed produced hybrid cannas. In addition to profuse flowering, they’re highly rated for their compact bushy plant habit and ability to form multiple shoots. They bloom earlier and continue nonstop through summer up to first frost. Their bold, […]