Archive for the ‘Spring flowering bulbs’ Category

Avoid Dreaded Tulip Fire Disease

For over a one-half century Kingwood Center in Mansfield, Ohio has been widely known for their fabulous tulip displays every spring. Over the past few years Kingwood’s garden staff had noted a decline in bloom because of a disease identified as “Tulip Fire” (Botrytis tulipae). This fungal botrytis disease tends to accumulate in the soil […]

Late Rising Perennials

              As air temperatures rise in the spring, most garden perennials and wildflowers are emerging from the ground. With the sudden appearance of 80°F temperatures, many seem to blast through the still cold soil in 1-2 days, and in full bloom a few weeks later. Yet, through the month […]

Basic Care Tips In The Spring Perennial Garden

              In late winter – early spring, after the snow has melted and daytime temperatures are steadily above freezing, let’s get busy with the cleanup in the perennial garden. First, if you garden in a severe winter region such as zones 4 or colder, remove all winter protection such […]

Fritillarias – Very Different Spring Flowering Bulb

Crown imperial (Fritillaria imperialis), aka fritillaria, is an impressive spring flowering bulb that is native of Southwestern Asia to the Himalayas (USDA hardiness zones 5-8). In late April to May, large drooping orange, red, or yellow bell-shaped flowers are topped by a small pineapple-like tufts of leaf-like bracts. The leafy fringe on top resembles a […]

Comparing Oriental Lilies To Asiatic Lilies

Both Asiatic and Oriental lilies (Lilium spp.) are popular lilies in U.S. gardens. Hybrid cultivars share traits of both species. Lilies grow in a wide variety of soil types and are not pH sensitive. They flower in full to part partial sun (5 hours minimum of sunlight).  Both prefer a well-drained soil and mulch to keep roots […]

Medical Benefits Derived From Gardening

For hundreds of years, home gardeners have realized that growing plants is good for you both physically and mentally. A story recently published in British tabloid The Guardian reports that many patients suffering with cancer, dementia and mental health problems can benefit from gardening. Doctors are more and more prescribing gardening for patients with cancer, […]

Crocus: A Fine Start To Spring

              Crocus (Crocus spp.) can be your wake-up reminder that winter is coming to an end (USDA hardiness zones 3- 8). They bloom in late winter (in the south); fall blooming varieties are also available. Bulbs (they’re actually “corms”) are available in flower colors from blue, purple, white, yellow, and mixed […]

Should You Plant In Fall?

            Should you plant in the Fall? It depends what region you live in, what month in fall, and what species you’re planting. If you live in the mid-Atlantic, coastal New England, or Southeastern U.S., fall is an excellent time to set most hardy plants. Most (not all) trees, shrubs, perennials, […]

Critter-Resistant Flower Bulbs

              Who doesn’t love colorful flowering bulbs in the early spring garden? Unfortunately, many gardens are terrorized by flower-devouring deer or bulb-chomping squirrels, voles and other critters. When utilizing smelly sprays, expensive fencing, or firearms are not options, plant a wide choice of flower bulbs that critters don’t like. […]

Invite These “Bells” To Next Spring’s Garden Ball

Fall planting of many kinds of bulbs is a worthwhile long term investment of your time. Many bulbs (and corms) like daffodils and crocuses will naturalize where you plant them. They also bloom for long periods from late winter into spring. Bulbs bloom nice their first spring; flower heavier the second year; and multiply each […]